Skip to main content

Configure your database

This guide will help you configure your database. Parameters here should not be changed after installation unless you know what you are doing, as it may result in data losses.

PostgreSQL

You can use the provided database, or bring your own. Both can be used with any installation method (embedded cluster or existing cluster).

Embedded versus external

The embedded PostgreSQL requires no additional configuration. It is great for testing and small-size instances. It does not provide high availability. For backups, refer to the backup page.

The external PostgreSQL requires having an external database set up (e.g. with RDS on AWS). This is the recommended setup for large-scale deployments. Scaling, high availability, and backups should be managed with the provider's tools.

Embedded configuration

The embedded PostgreSQL is a PostgreSQL 13 running on a single pod. The only configurable option is the size of the disk. The default value should be enough for most cases.

You may increase it after installation, but not decrease it. See here for detailed procedure and prerequisites.

caution

If you are using PgBouncer, add the following to the pgbouncer.ini file to allow GitGuardian tasks such as repository integration to perform correctly:

[pgbouncer]
pool_mode = session
ignore_startup_parameters = options,[... other parameters if needed]

For additional details, visit: PgBouncer Configuration

External configuration

For an external PostgreSQL, you have the following configuration options:

  • Host: the IP or hostname for your PostgreSQL. Defaults to "postgres".
  • Port: the port on which PostgreSQL listens. Defaults to "5432".
  • Username: the user used to connect to the database. Required.
  • Password: the password used to connect to the database. Required.
  • Database: the name of the database to connect to. Defaults to "prm". The database must exist.
  • Schema: GitGuardian will use the default schema set for the user (usually 'public').

For scaling recommendations, refer to the hardware requirements for embedded clusters or existing clusters.

Helm-based installation

Helm installation currently supports only external databases. When installing via Helm, parameters will be passed via a YAML file. The following parameters must be set inline :

  • host
  • username if relevant
  • database
  • port (5432 will be used as default)
tip

For ensuring that your databases are properly configured and accessible, you can use our preflight script.

As for the password, it can either be set inside a Kubernetes secret, or set inline like the other parameters. Using secrets should be preferred over setting sensitive parameters inline in values.

If you choose the first method, add a secret to your namespace, if it doesn't exist yet:

kubectl create secret generic gitguardian-postgresql-secret \
--from-literal=POSTGRES_PASSWORD=my_pg_password

If you intend to enable TLS for your PostgreSQL database, the secret containing the password should also contain the TLS information. Refer to the secret as the postgresql.existingSecret parameter. the key to the password in this secret should be set as postgresql.existingSecretKeys.password:

postgresql:
host: null # PostgreSQL database hostname
username: null # PostgreSQL database username
database: null # PostgreSQL database name
port: 5432
existingSecret: gitguardian-postgresql-secret
existingSecretKeys:
password: "POSTGRES_PASSWORD"

If you choose the second method, your YAML file should contain this extract:

postgresql:
host: null # PostgreSQL Database host name
username: null # PostgreSQL Database username
database: null # PostgreSQL database name
port: 5432
password: "my_pg_password"

Database User Permissions

When setting up your PostgreSQL database, it is essential to configure the database user with the appropriate permissions.

The user specified in the configuration (username parameter) should be the owner of the database:

ALTER DATABASE my_pg_database OWNER TO my_pg_database_user;

If this is not possible due to internal regulation, the user will need the following rights:

  1. Connection and object creation to the database: The user should have the privilege to connect to the database, and to create extensions and schemas in it.

    GRANT ALL ON DATABASE my_pg_database TO my_pg_database_user;
  2. Table and other objects Creation: To create tables, indexes, triggers and views, the user needs the right to create objects in the specified schema.

    GRANT ALL ON SCHEMA public TO my_pg_database_user;
  3. Data Modification Rights: The user must have the necessary rights to insert, update, and delete data in the tables.

    GRANT ALL ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA public TO my_pg_database_user WITH GRANT OPTION;

Redis

You can use the provided cache, or bring your own. Both can be used with any installation method (embedded cluster or existing cluster).

Type: embedded/external

The embedded Redis requires no additional configuration. It is great for testing and small-size instances. It does not provide high availability. For backups, refer to the backup page.

The external Redis requires having an external cache set up (e.g. with Elasticache on AWS). This is the recommended setup for large-scale deployments. Scaling, high availability, and backups should be managed with the provider's tools.

KOTS-based installation

External configuration

For an external Redis, you have the following configuration options:

  • Host: the IP or hostname for your Redis. Defaults to "redis".
  • Port: the port on which Redis listens. Defaults to "6379".
  • Username: the user used to connect to the cache. Can be left empty.
  • Password: the password used to connect to the cache. Required.
  • Use TLS: checkbox to specify how to communicate with Redis.

External Redis Sentinel configuration

For an external Redis Sentinel, you have the following configuration options:

  • Host: Comma-separated list of Redis Sentinel hosts.
  • Port: the port on which Redis listens. Defaults to "6379".
  • Master Service Name: the master Set name. Required.
  • Master Username: the master user used to connect to the cache. Can be left empty.
  • Master Password: the master password used to connect to the cache. Required.
  • Sentinel Username: the sentinel user used to connect to the cache. Can be left empty.
  • Sentinel Password: the sentinel password used to connect to the cache. Required.
  • Use TLS: checkbox to specify how to communicate with Redis.

When utilizing Redis Sentinel for high availability, ensure that the Redis master password matches with the Redis sentinel's password. By default, Sentinel operates on TCP port "26379".

Helm-based installation

When installing via Helm, parameters will be passed via a YAML file.

External redis server configuration

You can pass the whole URL directly, or provide host, username, password and port individually. The URL will be composed in the following way:

redis(s)://$user:$password@$host:$port

Additionally, the password and url should be passed inline or via a Kubernetes existing secret. Using secrets should be preferred over setting sensitive parameters inline in values.

If you choose the first option, create a Kubernetes secret in your cluster containing either the URL or the password to your Redis, and refer to it as the existingSecret in your values file.

kubectl create secret generic gitguardian-redis-secret \
--from-literal=REDIS_URL=my_redis_url

If you intend to enable TLS for your Redis, the secret containing the password should also contain the TLS information.

Depending on your choices, your YAML file should contain one of:

Sensitive parameter in secret (preferred)Sensitive parameter inline
Url passed directly
redis:
main:
existingSecret: "gitguardian-redis-secret"
existingSecretKeys:
url: "REDIS_URL"
redis:
main:
url: "redis://:redis_password@123.456.789.123:6379"
Url recomposed from elements
redis:
main:
user: "redis_user"
host: "123.456.789.123"
port: 6379
existingSecret: "gitguardian-redis-secret"
existingSecretKeys:
password: "REDIS_PASSWORD"
redis:
main:
user: "redis_user"
host: "123.456.789.123"
port: 6379
password: "redis_password"

External Redis Sentinel configuration

Under redis.main, you need to configure user, password. Those credentials belongs to the master.

Under redis.main.sentinel, you need to configure enabled, url, user, password and masterServiceName.

Additionally, both password fields and url should be passed via a Kubernetes secret, though it is possible to pass them inline, or via an external secret. Using secrets should be preferred over setting sensitive parameters inline in values.

If you choose the first option, create a Kubernetes secret in your cluster containing either the URL or the password to your Redis, and refer to it as the existingSecret in your values file.

kubectl create secret generic gitguardian-redis-secret \
--from-literal=REDIS_URL=my_redis_url

If you intend to enable TLS for your Redis, the secret containing the password should also contain the TLS information.

Depending on your choices, your YAML file should contain one of:

Sensitive parameter in secret (preferred)Sensitive parameter inline
Sentinel
redis:
main:
existingSecret: gitguardian-redis-secret
existingSecretKeys:
password: redis-password
sentinel:
url: redis-sentinel-url
password: redis-password
sentinel:
enabled: true
masterServiceName: gitguardian-redis
redis:
main:
password: "redis_password"
sentinel:
enabled: true
url: 123.456.789.123:26379
password: "redis_sentinel_password"
masterServiceName: gitguardian-redis

Second Redis instance for commit cache

You can configure a second Redis instance that will be dedicated to the commit cache feature.

Commit cache allows better performances for both real-time and historical scans by keeping the results of commits already scanned in a cache.

You can configure a second Redis instance that will be dedicated to the commit cache feature. We only recommend this option for big instances (more than 100GB of code for the entire perimeter) where the commit cache should be configured with a minimum of 16GB.

This second Redis instance has the same configuration options as the main one.

On KOTS-based installations, you can access configuration options by checking the Commit cache Redis checkbox in the Redis section in the KOTS Admin Console.

On Helm-based installations, you can configure this option under the redis.commitCache keys in your values file.

How can I help you ?